Yannis Papayannis – United Again (1/3) [From a series after the book The Hellenics and Hellenic Love, by James Davidson]

$1,900.00

Yannis Papayannis (b. 1962)
United Again (1/3)                                                             
acrylic on paper                         
2010                                                                                          
40 x 50 cm. (each)                    
(3)                                                                                           
from a series after the book The Hellenics and Hellenic Love, by James Davidson

1 in stock

Description

Artist/Maker: Yannis Papayannis (b. 1962)

Object/Materials and Techniques: Acrylic on paper

Date: Painted in 2010

Dimensions: H. 40 cm. x W. 50 cm.

Art style: Abstract art/Pop surrealism/Lowbrow art

Current Location: Artist’s collection

Curator’s note: |’n Art| presents three paintings from a series of works Yannis Papayannis made after reading the book, The Hellenics and Hellenic Love, by James Davidson. A book with rare insights into the complex and peculiar – for a great number of people- world of Ancient Hellenic love and homosexuality. The artist chose some intriguing stories from the book and animated them.
The painting herein constitutes a tribute to Eros, the Ancient Hellenic God of Sensual Love and Desire. A man is violently separated into two desperate entities who follow separate perilous, obscure roads till they meet again and, owing to winged Eros, reunite and become one entity anew.
A special perspective of erotic love is explored in this piece, the one of finding the alter ego. Yannis Papayannis with his skilful use of colour juxtapositions, brighter and darker at the same time, succeeds in drawing attention to the dynamism of Ero-tic love and seeks to emphasize on the sentimental transitions that love may provoke, culminating to the happy ending of the utter coupling and junction.
Inspired by cartoons’ characters and scenery, he employs abstract imagery based on comics and underground aesthetics. By displaying, in an ostentatious and tawdry manner, narratives of mythology and classical antiquity he further spotlights the alluring of the scenery and foregrounds the seductively existence of his calm, at times, yet, overall, disquieting characters.

Nelly Fili